What is in a Plotline?

Little decorative thanksgiving themed corn and squashesThis is a Generated Plotline

It contains a Main Character, 2nd Character, Setting, Situation, Theme and Character Action.

MC = A woman in her early thirties, who is very foolish.
2nd C = A woman in her sixties, who can be quite manipulative.
Setting = The story begins in a restaurant.
Situation = Someone is accused of theft.
Theme = It’s a story about pride.
Character Action = Your character sets out to change everyone’s opinion.

This particular plot line will be on our blog at wrtierschatroom.com/wp and at our Forum.

Click on this Plot Generator Page and Generate your own plot line. Or use the idea above and share it here. Scroll down till you see the reply/comment box.

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5 Tips for #NaNoWriMo I’ve Learned from My 464-Day Writing Streak – Sunday’s Topic Chat

5 Tips for #NaNoWriMo I’ve Learned from My 464-Day Writing Streak

Men Streaking National Novel Writing Month is like a marathon for writers. It’s designed to be hard, and designed to push you to write every day. That isn’t an easy thing. Like anyone training for a marathon, it helps to know how fast you can run a mile, and how long you can sustain that pace. The same is true for writing in NaNoWriMo.

My favorite tip –

3 Do not rewrite, do not delete

Trying to do so would be like trying to run a marathon in a tuxedo without breaking a sweat. There’s no point.

Join us on Sunday for a Topic Chat

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Prompts & Word Sprints

word sprintsIt is that NaNoWriMo time of year and I hope everyone will enjoy a ‘prompt’ chat.

You do not need to be a November Novel Writing Month Participant to join us.

We will do timed writings using a random prompt generator.

Guests may type their responses directly into the chatroom or use your favorite word processing program.  There won’t be time to edit or dilly-dally over grammar, content or spelling. Sharing is optional but I think it is much more fun for everyone to share.

These word sprints will awaken your muse. In NaNo, a word sprint gets a writer un-stuck. They often come in useful to motivate a participant just enough to reach his or her daily word count.

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Let’s Talk Horror

Due to unforeseen circumstances, Sunday’s Guest spot is on hold.

Instead we will present a Topic Chat on How to write a horror story: 6 terrific tips.

empty rocking chair in a dark roomIs Terror the same as Horror?

Mmm, well, not so much.

 ‘Terror’ describes a state of feeling. Oxford Dictionaries simply define it as ‘extreme fear’. To ‘terrorize’, means to use extreme fear to intimidate others. Horror, however, also suggests elements of disgust and surprise or shock. Thus the word ‘horror’ describes not only extreme fear but also revulsion and a sense of surprise and the unexpected.

The best horror stories share at least five elements in common:

  1. They explore ‘malevolent’ or ‘wicked’ characters, deeds or phenomena.
  2. They arouse feelings of fear, shock or disgust as well as the sense of the uncanny-
  3. Horror books convey intense emotion, mood, tone and environments.
  4. In horror the ghosts and werewolves are very, very real.
  5. Horror tends to deal with morbid situations, from repetitive cycles of violence to death-related uncanny scenarios.

How do you write a horror story or novel like Stephen King, Clive Barker or (looking further back in the genre’s history) Edgar Allan Poe? 

Come to Sunday’s Topic Chat and help us discuss the various aspects Horror and Terror and how to write them.

 

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Horror Month at The Writer’s Chatroom

tell tale heart

Welcome to Horror Month at The Writer’s Chatroom

Sunday’s Topic chat will let us view Horror and Horror Writing from the safety of The Writer’s Chatroom.

“It’s the dark basement where the only thing you can hear is the beating of your own heart.”

tell tale heart

The history of horror is long, dating back to the era of the Inquisitions.  Before delving into the History of Horror we need to define it. Trap it in some way, long enough to have a look at its scary parts. This is no easy task. Horror comes from within and without. Tangible and elusive. We all have fears, the things that keep us awake at night or the things in our dreams that awaken us at night. Some fears are rational others, such as the fear of things to the left of your body are not so rational.

In horror writing it is the writer’s job to frighten the reader. To bring out fears the reader may not even be aware exist.

“For the Horror Writer, the more real, the better. And the scarier. It’s the dark basement where the only thing you can hear is the beating of your own heart. That’s real horror. The kind of stuff that makes the hair on the back of your neck stand up, as if someone was standing inches behind you.

inquisitionBut writing horror isn’t so easy. With any type of fiction, it’s difficult to think of something that hasn’t already been done. With horror fiction, it’s especially true. Creepy basements, loud noises from the attic, hidden rooms, Indian burial grounds, old hotels, multiple personality disorder, etc.—it’s all been done before, and it’s all out there. These clichés shouldn’t restrain you, however. They’ve simply defined the space you’re working in. You know what’s there, now create your own story.”

Join us Sunday as we prepare for the arrival of our October Celebrity Guests, Loren Rhoads, Mary SanGiovanni, John Everson and our Quarterly Celebrity Guest Barb Drozdowich.

candy cornResources for Sunday’s chat include The Writers Digest, CM Humphries, 6 Things American Horror Story Can Teach Us About Writing, 5 Elements of a Good Horror Story, a list of phobias and other websites I found while following a trail of candy corn.

 

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7 Reasons You Shouldn’t Be Editing Your Own Book

7 Reasons You Shouldn’t Be Editing Your Own Book

Reference booksOur Sunday Topic will look at and discuss the various reasons, 7, that you shouldn’t be editing your own book.

Drop by the Chatroom and help us keep the discussion lively.

First I want to Slip in a little information outlining the difference between Revision and Editing.

The Difference Between Editing and Revising (and how you can accomplish both)

Technically speaking, revising is the act of altering the content of your novel rather than the words themselves. This includes:

  • Plot Holes
  • Your Hook
  • Purpose
  • Character Arcs
  • Exposition and Backstory
  • Pacing
  • and a few other things.

Technically speaking, editing consists of the changes you make to the actual wording of your novel. There are two main types of editing: line edits and copy edits. Line edits consist of changing the wording of your novel as to make it better understood and enjoyed by readers.

When making line edits, you’ll literally go through your novel, line by line, and look for the following things:

  • Flow
  • Redundancy
  • Filler
  • Show, Don’t Tell
  • Grammar
  • Spelling
  • Formatting
  • Clarity

You Can’t Edit Your Own Book and Here are 7 Reasons Why

Some Outtakes from the Article 

When you love what you see, you don’t see what you don’t want to see. Your brain loves you too much to inflict that kind of damage upon you.

Love leads to believing your book is flawless.

Familiarity leads to believing your book is you.

If you’ve ever found yourself skipping over parts during self-editing because you just want to get through that phase faster, you’re making a critical mistake.

Tiredness leads to mistakes.

https://thewritelife.com/you-cant-edit-your-own-book/

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Topic Chat – 5 Healthy Writing Habits

Writer’s Chatroom Sunday Chat – Writerly Hygiene

5 Healthy Writing Habits All Aspiring Writers Should Practice

Sunday August 13 7PM ET

Writer’s Chatroom Sunday Chat – Writerly Hygiene

Hand Wash SignWriters aren’t exactly known as the paragons of physical and mental health. Almost prerequisites for the craft, depression and alcoholism have haunted so many eminent writers, including Ernest Hemingway, Stephen King, Edgar Allen Poe, and Sylvia Plath. Although living a stable, healthy lifestyle might be alien to many successful authors, healthy writing habits are not.

Yes, writing is a creative process, but it is also work that demands discipline and routine. As Hemingway said, “Prose is architecture, not interior decoration.” Here are five habits that behoove any aspiring writer to follow.

Critique Chat with Audrey Shaffer is Coming Up on 27 August at 7PM ET Check your Newsletter Reminder for Guidelines.

You don’t get the Newsletter?  Sign up below.

Sign Up for our Newsletter Reminder, it has content you won’t see here on our website.

Don’t be shy about sharing our website with your friends on social media.  We treat our visitors kindly. In other words, we don’t bite, but we dangle participles.

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Essential Tips for Aspiring Novelists

Join us in the Chatroom on Sunday 7PM ET

Bonnie is moderating the second part of her topic from July 2nd.

girl walking on tightropeSo you want to be a writer? Essential tips for aspiring novelists

Everybody who has ever felt the need to write knows the silent hour. I have come across many such people – and indeed many such hours – during my writing and teaching life. I’ve been teaching now for the best part of 20 years. That’s a lot of chalk and a lot of red pencil. I haven’t loved every minute of it, but I’ve loved most. There’s been a National Book award for one student. A Booker prize for another. Guggenheims. Pushcarts. Mentorships. Friendships. But let’s be honest, there has been burnout too. There’s been weeping and gnashing of teeth. There have been walkouts. Collapses. Regret.

Join Bonnie in a writerly discussion.  We can’t wait to share with you.

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