August is Humor Month!

We are talking Humor all month long. When you drill down on humor as a writer’s tool things tend toward serious things right away. 

Tim Jackson put it in a nutshell when he wrote, “So let me, first off, provide my wholly unscientific theory of being funny: Some people are funny. Some people are not. Pretty simple, really.” 

Tonight’s topic is about how to write a Humor Essay. It seems many of the How-To articles I am tracking down are written for school aged people. I’ll be adding Bonus Links after the main feature.

How to Write a Humor Essay

 
A good humor essay will have your reader in stitches.


When it comes to telling jokes, it’s often said that it’s all in the delivery. By writing a humor essay, you can get around that one hurdle, but there are others to avoid. A successful humor essay will entertain readers as much as a successful comedian will entertain audiences.

  • Pick a topic that is easily accessible
  • Keep it short and sweet
  • Tell a Story
  • Contrast Funny with Sad and Mundane

The Following are Bonus Links, a few are Contenders for another Topic Chat.

Laughing Through Life: Humor in Autobiographical Writing

Humor Writing: 15 Markets That Pay You to Make People Laugh

Honest Writing Is Funny Writing

Memoirist Sean Wilsey says he knows he’s finished with a story when it makes him laugh.

Please follow and like us:

Blog or Website

Blog or Website

July is Website/Blog Building Month

Let’s start off with a Topic Chat about the difference between a blog and a website.

What is the Difference Between a Blog and a Website?

The difference, it turns out, may be only in our minds.  To begin our July Theme we will look at Blog/Website Building in Geek Speak and Plain English so we have a better understanding about what we are planning and why.

Trish Jones says it well in her article about Blogs vs Websites–

For those of you who may not know what a blog is, it’s short for web log, and is a frequently updated website consisting of blog posts, or entries (more often than not, dated entries) that are arranged in reverse chronological order. So when a reader comes to your site, they see your most recent article (often called posts), first.

Trish Jones 

 

Future Topics

Please follow and like us:

That’s Not How I Remember It!

“Dude, like no way. That’s not the way I remember it – at all. You can’t be saying that.”

May is Memoir Month at The Writers Chat Room.

Come visit on Sunday as we talk about memory. Should you share with family and friends, especially during your first draft? When does a memory become more fiction than fact? Does family input rob you of a story which should have been yours?

How True and Factual Does Your Memoir Have to Be? 5 Principles

Much of what we remember is forever lost in the physical world, however much it may shimmer and possess us now. Can we trust our memories as “facts?” And what if others disagree? How do we explain our creative process and answer their protests? Here are a few principles to assist you.

Read the whole article and come chat with us.

May 6th at 7PM ET at The Writers Chat Room

Sign up for our newsletter or subscribe to our blog.

Please follow and like us:

Join us throughout the month of May as we focus on Memoir Writing

it’s your story

Wednesday and Sunday we will talk about what defines a memoir.

How does it differ from a personal essay or an autobiography? When does a Memoir slip into the area of becoming a Therapy Journal?  What is a Fictionalized Memoir? Is a Fictionalized Memoir the thing we write while waiting for our ‘characters’ to pass on?

We will start with these questions and begin exploring things to include and avoid while writing a memoir.

AUTOBIOGRAPHY, MEMOIR, PERSONAL HISTORY – WHAT’S THE DIFF? AND DOES IT MATTER?


Visit our Calendar Page and Subscribe using your favorite calendar software. You’ll be among the first to know our upcoming Topics and Celebrity Guests.

Subscribe to our Blog and new posts will appear in your inbox, complete with images and links.

Shopping on Amazon? Come to our site first. Purchases made through our site earn us pennies on your dollars and help keep our software paid up.

Please follow and like us:

You’ve Written a Children’s Book – Now What?

 

So, You’ve Written a Children’s Book…Now What?

Chronicle Books posted on Sunday’s Topic.

We receive about a thousand unsolicited children’s manuscripts every month, like the ones in the mail bins below. Every one of them is read by a children’s editor here, and I’m here to offer you some tips on how to make your manuscript stand out from the pack.

Before you submit your children’s project to Chronicle Books, I’d encourage you to immerse yourself in the industry, hone your craft, and do your research.

Join us at 7PM EDT Sunday Evening by choosing the Public Chatroom in the Popup Window.

 

Please follow and like us:

Our Wednesday Mini Topic – 6 Keys to Write a YA Novel

6 Keys to Write a YA Novel That Connects With Teen Readers

Writing a novel that appeals to a younger audience takes a certain amount of finesse—especially if you are no longer in that age bracket! It is not easy to venture into the minds of young adults and, essentially, “relive” your own past.

At Inkitt, I am regularly in touch with published authors who are eager to share their experience and provide support to emerging writers. Let’s have a look at six essential tips they have shared with us when it comes to writing YA novels.

The emotional drive of YA fiction is what truly separates it from other stories, and it is clear why so many people identify with it. It’s the ability of these texts to inherently understand and explore the emotions of humans that makes them such an enjoyable journey.

Keep your characters complex, your emotions high and your conflict enticing, and you’ll be well on your way to a great piece of YA fiction.

Please follow and like us:

Creating Your First Children’s Picture Book

10 Tips For Creating Your First Children’s Picture Book

Roughly drawn child 2A children’s picture book may seem simple, but creating a brilliant one is no easy task. How do you make yours smart, engaging, and fun — rather than clichéd, saccharine, and didactic?

“A picture book is a marriage of words and pictures,” describes Santopolo. “The most successful illustrations are the ones that take a story to another level. They don’t just illustrate the words. They add something else to them.”

Please follow and like us:

10 Tips For Creating Your First Children’s Picture Book

Wednesday’s Topic continues our April Theme

Children/YA Writing Month

10 Tips For Creating Your First Children’s Picture Book

 

A children’s picture book may seem simple, but creating a brilliant one is no easy task. How do you make yours smart, engaging, and fun — rather than clichéd, saccharine, and didactic?

“A picture book is a marriage of words and pictures,” describes Santopolo. “The most successful illustrations are the ones that take a story to another level. They don’t just illustrate the words. They add something else to them.”

 

Join us in the Chat Room on Wednesday 8PM EDT

Please follow and like us:

April – Children/Young Adult Month

April  is Children/Young Adult Month at The Writers Chat Room.

If you write in a youth centered category or are thinking about breaking into this market The Writers Chat Room is touching on the topic throughout the month of April.

On April 4th and 8th we are going to kick off the topic with Understanding Children’s Book Categories from Picture Books to YA.

Categories 

  • Board books & concept books—birth to 4
  • Picture books—3 to 8
  • Picture story books—5 to 8
  • Early readers—5 to 7
  • Chapter books—6 to 7 & 8 to 10
  • Middle grade novels—8 to 12
  • Tween novels—10 to 14
  • Younger YA novels—13 to 16 and up
  • Older YA novels—15 to 18 and up
  • New adult—17 to mid-20s

 

Please follow and like us:

Revising and Editing

March is Revision and Editing Month at The Writer’s Chat Room.

Each Wednesday topic will have some connection to revision and editing. This week we are going to discuss the difference between the two writing tasks.

While the words revise and edit are often used interchangeably, the two are actually not the same thing. In this article we will go over the key differences to help you understand more about the writing process to prepare for publishing.

Understanding the Difference Between Revising and Editing

(And Why You Need Both)

banging head on yellow signWhen revising your manuscript, you are changing the meaning or way in which the reader perceives, experiences and interprets it.

When editing a manuscript, only the structure of writing is corrected.

Revising and editing are both equally important when it comes to preparing a manuscript for submission to an editor. Trying to lump them both together in one step can cause a lot of confusion, and quite possibly even more errors.

You must both revise and edit your work to make it the best it can be prior to sending it off to a publishing house.

Join us for a topic chat about the differences between Revising and Editing.

 

Please follow and like us: